How to sheetrock mud corners

Tip: When working with tape, the longer the better, but you may have to experiment to find a length that is easy to handle. Unroll several lengths of drywall tape to cover the corner, overlapping the ends. Fold the tape in half along the crease made by the manufacturer.

Taping 3 Joints That Meet At a Corner (Interior or Exterior) If you have 3 joints that meet at an interior corner, you should clip off the paper tape at angles as shown below in Figure 2 so the corners do not overlap. If you are finishing an exterior corner with metal corner bead, clip off the corners in a similar manner. Taping 3 Joints That Meet At a Corner (Interior or Exterior) If you have 3 joints that meet at an interior corner, you should clip off the paper tape at angles as shown below in Figure 2 so the corners do not overlap. If you are finishing an exterior corner with metal corner bead, clip off the corners in a similar manner.

Load bearing corners will often have bellied out areas in the metal corners. Short of replacing the whole corner bead, I would take a hack saw and saw a kerf through the bead to remove the tension. Then put drywall screws on both sides of the cut to firm up the metal corner, then just apply drywall mud in the normal fashion. The problem is, how do we tape and mud the corners between the old and new? Do we need to sand down the old walls where they meet the new? The texture on the walls is not very heavy - it's known around here as "knock-down" or "orange peel". STEP 1: Mix mud, Spread. Mix up your joint compound (With water) until it is thin enough to work with. For more on mud and how to mix go here All about Joint Compound. Using a drywall pan and a 10" knife, spread a nice even bed of mud on one side of the corner bead. Try to go from the ceiling down a little past half way. Snip a short piece of Shower Bead and lay it on the wall. If the Shower Bead does not lay flat, then tear off the support leg as shown. Dry fit and cut the Shower Bead to length. Spray the bead with Trim-Tex 847 Spray Adhesive. Immediately apply to the drywall. Once in position, press the legs into place. To begin scoop drywall mud onto one corner of the six inch drywall knife. Run this bead of mud down one side of the angel to lay an even coat of mud. To cover an 8 foot angle, you may need to refill your knife at least twice. After you have covered one side of the angle, do the same on the opposite side.

The tapered drywall joint results in nearly invisible seams because the mudding compound perfectly fits in the "valley" and does not rise above the level of the drywall facing. With the tapered drywall joint, you can even use a stronger type of tape, such as mesh fiberglass drywall tape. Then cut a new piece of corner bead to fit. For a smooth seam, it’s often helpful to slide a small piece of corner bead under each end of the existing corner bead. If you choose to do this, simply place your new piece of corner bead over the small patch pieces. Adjust as needed, securing your patch piece of corner bead with drywall screws. At the corner, use a 6 inch joint knife and mud pan to apply a thick coat of joint compound to both walls. Work the entire length of the corner at once. Fill from the corner, out onto the drywall several inches with about ¼inch of mud. Keep the tape folded and starting at one end,...